College Catalog




 

Programs of Study & Course Descriptions

 

 

Programs of Study may be found here.

 

Course Descriptions

 

 

ACCOUNTING

 

ACC103 INTRODUCTORY ACCOUNTING 4 CR

This course provides the opportunity for the student to develop the knowledge and application of basic accounting principles. The course covers accounting theory and practice that concerns recording business activities, composing financial reports, and using accounting information in business decision making.

 

ACC135 ACCOUNTING WITH COMPUTERS 2 CR

This course provides an overview of accounting with the utilization of computerized software to aid in managing a small business.

 

ACC204 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 4 CR

This course provides the opportunity for the student to develop the knowledge and application of accounting theory and practices related to investments and equity. It concerns the use of basic financial statement analysis for business purposes, including planning, control, and decision making. (Prerequisite: ACC103)

 

ACC216 GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING 4 CR

Examine the basic operation of governmental and non-profit entities, their accounting and reporting systems. (Prerequisite: ACC103)

 

ACC217 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING 4 CR

Prepare income statements, balance sheets, cash flow statements, cash and receivables; determine inventories and cost of goods sold, non-current operating assets, accounting changes/corrections; financial statement analysis. (Prerequisite: ACC103)

 

ACC231 PAYROLL ACCOUNTING 3 CR

Payroll and personnel records, Social Security, withholding tax, unemployment compensation, time sheets and timekeeping records, and legal aspects of payroll. (Prerequisite: ACC103)

 

ACC232 PERSONAL TAX ACCOUNTING 4 CR

History and research of tax law and regulations; preparation of Federal and State of Wisconsin individual income taxes, including forms 1040, 1040A, and 1040EZ, and supporting schedules and forms. (Prerequisite: ACC103)

 

ACC233 ADVANCED MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 3 CR

Cost behavioral patterns, cost-volume-profit relationships, segment reporting, profit planning, budgets and overhead analysis, decentralized operations, pricing decisions, capital investment decisions, and service department costing. (Prerequisite: ACC204)

 

ACC234 COST ACCOUNTING 4 CR

Contemporary cost environment and issues; selecting, analyzing and tracking costs; production costing methods; job order, process, and standard costs; by-product and joint costing. (Prerequisite: ACC204)

 

ACC299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

ACC350 LIFE CYCLE ACCOUNTING 3 CR

This course looks at different aspects of a product life cycle process. It encompasses several fields and takes students from opportunity identification to the end of the product life cycle process. This includes accounting, marketing, finance, concept development, testing, public policy, copyright protection, economic profit and residual effects. (Prerequisites: ACC103; MAT104 or MAT106)

 

ANTHROPOLOGY

 

ANT200 INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURES 3 CR

An introductory survey of selected Native American cultures, including the Menominee and other Wisconsin Tribes. Includes basic anthropological concepts to aid the student in the study of culture. (Prerequisites: ENG100 or ENG101 or instructor consent) (HUM or SS; TH)

 

ANT299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

ART

 

ART106 FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGN 3 CR

This course introduces students to the seven principles of design: balance, movement, rhythm, contrast, emphasis, pattern and unity. It will include hands-on assignments using the elements of design: line, form, shape, color, value, texture and space. (FA or HUM)

 

ART299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ART 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

BIOLOGY

 

BIO110 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN BIOLOGY 3 CR

Basic concepts, principles, and processes in human biology: origin of life, evolution, cells, population, genetics, reproduction, disease, the anatomy and function of major organ systems. (FL, SP; NS)

 

BIO111 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN BIOLOGY LAB 2 CR

Lab component of BIO110. (Concurrent Requisite: BIO110) (NS)

 

BIO202 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY 5 CR

Biological principles, structure, and function of organisms with consideration of interactions at the cellular level and examination of the relationships of organisms to the environment. Includes lab. (NS)

 

BIO204 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 5 CR

Structure and function of the body, its organs and organ systems, including skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, urinary, and reproductive systems. Includes lab. (NS or PS)

 

BIO205 INTRODUCTION TO PLANT BIOLOGY 5 CR

General biological principles with emphasis on growth, reproduction, structure, and functions of plants; morphological studies of typical plants. Includes lab. (Prerequisite: BIO202) (NS)

 

BIO207 PRINCIPLES OF MICROBIOLOGY 4 CR

Microorganisms and their activities; their form, structure, reproduction, physiology, metabolism, and identification; their distribution in nature and their relationship to each other and other living things. Includes lab. (Prerequisite: BIO202) (NS)

 

BIO299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY 1-5 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

 

BUS100 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 3 CR

Covers business enterprise and its resources, competitive/regulatory environments, pricing, profit, finance, planning, controls, ethics, environmental impact, social responsibility, and other important concepts. (SS)

 

BUS105 SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING 3 CR

This course explores new technologies and theories surrounding product marketing and social media optimization. Students examine current trends in web marketing and study how to construct promotions, generate targeted online traffic, create and position content to create overall brand awareness in the digital domain.

 

BUS110 PERSONAL FINANCE 3 CR

A study of financial management. Examines the financial problems and financial decisions facing individuals in our economy. Subjects covered include family budgeting, consumer buying decisions, borrowing, insurance, personal real estate, taxation, investments, and estate planning.

 

BUS112 BUSINESS LAW 3 CR

Introduction to principles of law relating to business. Historical, social, governmental, and ethical developments are emphasized. Includes contracts, property, sale of goods, government regulation, professional malpractice, and product liability.

 

BUS120 PRINCIPLES OF SUPERVISION 3 CR

Introduction to principles of supervisory management. Course will cover management functions and skills needed to perform functions, the history of management, contemporary management trends, ethics, communication, interpersonal relations, and will introduce the concepts of total quality management. The course will emphasize application of theory by case studies and practical scenarios, and analyze successful management practices.

 

BUS200 PROJECT MANAGEMENT I 3 CR

This course provides the opportunity for the learner to develop the knowledge, skills, process, and understanding of project manager roles and responsibilities; tools and methods of project management, phases of project management, and preparation of typical project documentation. It also provides an overview of project management software. (Prerequisites: ENG100 or ENG101 or ENG215)

 

BUS205 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3 CR

Explores the role of the manager and entrepreneur in the small business environment. Special problems in the areas of marketing, finance, record-keeping, taxes, decision-making, risk-taking, and business law are covered.

 

BUS210 INTRODUCTION TO FINANCE 3 CR

This course exposes the student to careers in finance and the foundations of finance. It provides an introduction to the financial system in the U.S. Topics include financial management, financial markets and investments, and financial analysis and decision making.

 

BUS215 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 3 CR

This course is designed to take students into the world of public administration so they can see how government agencies are structured, how public officials make decisions and how budgets are developed and implemented within a political system. The content areas include administrative and organizational theory, human resource management, policy analysis, program evaluation, and regulatory administration.

 

BUS220 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 3 CR

Study of marketing theories and concepts used in the applications of marketing strategies in product development, distribution, pricing, and promotion. Case studies and a research paper required.

 

BUS225 INTRODUCTION TO PLANNING 3 CR

This course provides an orientation to urban, regional, rural, and tribal planning. Topics covered include planning for land use, transportation, and community development. Students will also evaluate the role governmental and tribal entities play in the comprehensive planning process. (Prerequisite: ECN202 or ECN203)

 

BUS226 ORGANIZATIONAL DYNAMICS 3 CR

The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation in organization culture and leadership. The course covers basic theories and practices of improving organizational and individual effectiveness, and leadership development. Ethics in organizational decision making is an underlying theme for the course. (Prerequisite: BUS100)

 

BUS290 PROFESSIONAL READINESS 2 CR

Each student will complete a field experience requirement in which he/she will, with the assistance of a Student Achievement Specialist, explore opportunities and work in a business organization prior to graduation. (Prerequisite: must have completed 36 or more credits)

 

BUS299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUSINESS 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

BUS300 PROJECT MANAGEMENT II 3 CR

This course is designed to build and expand students’ foundation of knowledge needed to manage resources, time, money, and scope. Students will use case studies to learn how to manage the uncertainty and risk associated with project work and how to contain the human elements of power, politics, and interrelationships that play into the success or failure of projects. (Prerequisite: BUS200)

 

BUS310 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC FINANCE 3 CR

Introduction to public finance provides foundations of public goods and finance and serves as an introduction to Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB). Students also learn about public programs, public revenue, and expenditure systems. This course exposes the student to skills in public administration. (Prerequisite: BUS210)

 

BUS315 REGULATION AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 3 CR

This course aims to provide an understanding of how the concept of Regulation is viewed and analyzed from the perspective of Public Administration. It is designed for current and future professionals in local and tribal governments and the private sector dealing with the Federal government to have a clearer appreciation of the general principles guiding the framing and implementation of regulation. (Prerequisite: BUS215)

 

BUS320 PUBLIC RELATIONS AND MARKETING 3 CR

This course examines the importance of maintaining communication with consumers/clients in the fast-paced, media-driven environment of the internet age through advertising, marketing, and the media. Students are exposed to theories of public relations, research methods, media relations, and the role of public relations and marketing in businesses, nonprofit organizations, tribal entities, and government.

 

BUS325 PLANNING THEORY AND METHODS 3 CR

The purpose of this course is to explore the relationship between planning theory and planning practice. The course will benefit students who are looking to make a career as a planning specialist as well as those who must deal with the milieu of issues of planning in the public, nonprofit and private sectors. The primary topics to be covered include: the intellectual foundations of the field of planning, the history of the profession, justifications for and critiques of centralized public planning, the various procedural theories of interest to practitioners, the role of politics, power and citizen participation in the practice of planning, ethics in the context of community culture and demographics and the role of planning in the development of a sustainable community. (Prerequisite: BUS225)

 

BUS330 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 3 CR

This course introduces students to marketing concepts and theories developed in the behavioral and economic sciences as they relate to consumer and business markets. Students will examine models of consumer behavior and organizational buying to learn how these behaviors are influenced by internal and external factors. Consumer and buyer behavior are discussed in the context of advertising/promotion, product management, and the development of effective marketing strategies.

 

BUS341 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 3 CR

Upon completion of this course the learner will have increased knowledge, skills and abilities in human resources management. Focus areas include strategic planning, recruiting, training, developing, and retaining employees, and labor relations.

 

BUS380 FUNDAMENTALS OF INVESTMENTS 3 CR

This introductory course provides a general survey of finance and investments, asset/liability valuations, risk and return, investment analysis, sources and uses of funds, cost of capital, and cash management. This course provides financial decision-making tools to the investment decision-making process. (Prerequisite: BUS210)

 

BUS385 FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 3 CR

The course will consider the economic principles underlying the workings of national and international financial institutions. This interactive course incorporates theory with the daily operations of financial systems from the government, financial industry and economist’s viewpoint using realistic scenarios. The stress is on financial regulations, instruments and markets in which securities are traded.

 

BUS390 FIELD EXPERIENCE 3 CR

Students will gain relevant work experience in Public Administration by volunteering in a government agency, non-profit organization, tribal organization, or community group. Instruction is a combination of class time and volunteering. Written reports and a final reflection are submitted to the instructor.

 

BUS400 LEADERSHIP IN ORGANIZATIONS 3 CR

This course introduces students to approaches, theories, and types of leadership as related to organizations, tribes, and businesses. Through personal observation, reflection, and research, students will examine approaches to leadership to understand how to use leadership skills to lead activities in organizations. (Prerequisites: ENG102 and ENG215)

 

BUS405 ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION 3 CR

This course examines organizational communication theories and processes that inform the study and practice of communication in organizations. Students are exposed to basic theories, concepts, and issues relevant to the field of organizational communication. In addition, the course focuses on organizational challenges including the most common organizational variables such as conflict, power, leadership styles, roles, relationships, and technology.

 

BUS410 PUBLIC BUDGETING AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION 3 CR

This course exposes the student to government and nonprofit budgeting processes and resource allocation. It provides foundations of public financial reporting processes using Government Accounting Standards Board practices. It is also an introduction to public capital projects and auditing. It covers budgeting and resource allocation for local, tribal, state, federal and non-profit entities. (Prerequisite: BUS310)

 

BUS420 SURVEY OF COMMUNITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT THEORY 3 CR

This course is intended to provide students with techniques essential to determining a community’s imperatives for developing economic development opportunities. Students are exposed to the skills necessary to formulate and apply an index that reflects a community’s readiness to retain existing businesses, attract new businesses and residents, and grow small businesses. (Prerequisites: BUS215 and ECN202)

 

BUS430 BUSINESS STATISTICS 3 CR

This course examines the importance of decision making supported by research and data analysis in public, non-profit, tribal, and private business administration. Students are exposed to statistical analysis, survey and sampling techniques, data collection, validation and research methods. This course uses Microsoft Excel extensively. (Prerequisite: MAT260)

 

BUS440 PROGRAM DESIGN, IMPLEMENTATION, AND EVALUATION 3 CR

In this course students learn about the techniques in human service needs assessment, goal setting, setting performance measures, designing operation modalities, conducting situational analysis, and budgeting. Students refine their skills in monitoring and evaluation, and reporting the effectiveness of the program to stakeholders compared to planned results, legal and fiscal requirements. (Prerequisites: BUS215 and BUS225)

 

BUS445 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 3 CR

This course addresses how to set-up, maintain, and reengineer processes that organizations use to provide services of public value. With an emphasis on cross-functional decision making, four major categories of operations management will be covered: processes, quality, capacity, and inventory. These process-oriented concepts can be applied to non-profit organizations, companies, tribal entities, and service industries. (Prerequisite: BUS430)

 

BUS450 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES, IMPACTS, AND ASSESSMENTS 3 CR

This course explores the process of environmental impact assessment and policy decision making. Students will be provided with skills for identification of purpose and need for any actions affecting the environment, development of objectives and decision criteria, and various techniques for assessing impact and comparing alternatives for a given environmental intervention. (Prerequisites: ECN202 and SDE100)

 

BUS455 TRIBES, ENTERPRISES, AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP 3 CR

This unique course addresses the challenges and opportunities of starting, owning and operating businesses and organizations in Indian Country. The course covers entrepreneurial resources available to Native Americans and other minority groups, tribally-owned businesses, small business contracting programs, and success stories. The extensive use of current materials and references provides current information on the political, social, and economical aspects of entrepreneurial ventures by American Indians. (Prerequisites: ENG102 and ENG215)

 

BUS465 INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENTS 3 CR

 

This course provides a general study of how global firms operate. Students will demonstrate an understanding of risk and return, investment analysis, effective use of funds, short- and long-term capital management for a global firm that operates under multiple cultures, geographic, economic and political environments. This course provides financial decision-making tools to the investment decision-making process from a global perspective. (Prerequisite: BUS210).

 

BUS475 RISK MANAGEMENT 3 CR

This course will guide students through risk planning techniques, issues about sovereign risk, risk response planning, risk monitoring and control, types of insurance and marketing systems. Using a series of hands-on exercises students will learn various risk management concepts, tools, and techniques in the global context. Special attention will be paid to design and implementation of risk management practices. (Prerequisites: BUS200 and BUS430)

 

BUS480 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT 3 CR

Strategic Management is an upper-level course that integrates other course material in the functional areas of finance, accounting, marketing, and human relations. The extensive use of case studies provides scenarios, which focus on decision making at all levels of management to formulate strategies to implement throughout an organization. (Prerequisites: BUS300, BUS400, and BUS430)

 

BUS485 CORPORATE FINANCE 3 CR

This introductory course concentrates on issues and analytical problems relating to corporate valuation, capital raising, financial decision, distress, mergers, and acquisitions. This course uses case studies, textbook, and journal articles to illustrate key decisions made by managers. (Prerequisite: BUS210)

 

BUS490 INTERNSHIP IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 3 CR

Students will gain relevant work experience in Public Administration by interning in a government agency, non-profit organization, tribal entity, or community group. This course is separated into two parts: Internship Orientation and Internship. Instructional times are set for Part I and students complete the hands-on portion at the internship location for Part II. Student must be within five classes of graduating in the CMN Public Administration Bachelor’s Degree program. (Prerequisites: BUS215, BUS310, and BUS390)

 

BUS495 SENIOR SEMINAR 1 CR

This is an emphasis course focusing on current trends, problems, and issues in the business world and their effect on business and business training. (Prerequisite: 90 credits completed including transfer credits)

 

BUS499 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUSINESS 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once. (Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing)

 

CHEMISTRY

 

CHM101 INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY 5 CR

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the topics of general chemistry. The focus of this course is numerical analysis, properties and characteristics of matter, and the language of chemistry. This class can also be used as a preparatory class for CHM110 and CHM205. Includes lab. (Prerequisite: MAT104 or MAT106) (NS or PS)

 

CHM110 BIOCHEMISTRY 5 CR

This course will introduce the concepts and terminology of organic chemistry and biochemistry. It will provide a foundation for further learning in topics related to nursing and health care, such as pharmacology and pathology. Building on prior knowledge of general chemistry, students will study the molecular basis for living things, and learn how the complex interactions of biomolecules are understandable and meaningful. Includes lab. (Prerequisite: CHM101)

 

CHM205 CHEMISTRY I 5 CR

The fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry. Topics include matter and measurement, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, thermochemistry, periodicity, gases, intermolecular forces, and aqueous solution chemistry. Includes lab. (Prerequisite: CHM101) (NS or PS)

 

CHM207 CHEMISTRY II 5 CR

The fundamental principles and concepts of inorganic chemistry are explored with an emphasis on thermodynamics, kinetics, properties of aqueous solutions, solution equilibria, acid-base reactions, coordination chemistry, oxidation-reduction reactions, and nuclear reactions. This is a course that develops chemical foundations required for professional and pre-professional programs. Includes lab. (Prerequisite: CHM205)

 

CHM231 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3 CR

This course covers the fundamental concepts and principles of organic chemistry. Topics include nomenclature, stereochemistry, and the relation between structure, properties and reaction mechanisms of aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatics and selected functional groups. Includes discussion section. (Prerequisite: CHM205)

 

CHM299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

COMMUNICATIONS

 

COM100 INTRODUCTION TO ORAL COMMUNICATION 3 CR

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic techniques of Oral Communication through a combination of oral presentations, text readings, classroom discussions, self-critiques, and peer critiques. Students will learn how to outline, formulate, and present effective speeches and will become equipped with the knowledge of what constitutes successful communication. (Prerequisite: EDU100) (CR)

 

COM299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNICATIONS 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

 

CRJ101 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3 CR

This course introduces the study of crime and the administration of justice in the United States. The course focuses on the roles of police, prosecution, courts, and corrections in dealing with people charged with the commission of crimes. Upon completion of this course, students will have a better understanding from a historical perspective of how the criminal justice process evolved and is carried out in the U.S. today. (SS)

 

CRJ110 CRIMINAL LAW 3 CR

This course covers the general principles of criminal law and the elements of specific crimes in Wisconsin. Students will learn to recognize when a crime has occurred under Wisconsin law and determine what charge is appropriate. (SS)

 

DIGITAL MEDIA

 

DGM100 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL MEDIA CREATION 3 CR

This course is designed as a digital media introduction focusing on the study of multimedia technology concepts, creation and management. Students will learn digital media management best practices and fundamental scientific concepts of digital media, and gain practical experience creating and manipulating digital images, audio, video, and broadcast media.

 

DGM101 DIGITAL AUDIO OVERVIEW 3 CR

This course explores audio capture, mixing and post-production techniques. Introducing the concept of analog to digital audio conversion, processing sound in digital domain, MIDI music creation and production, audio production, video soundtracks, broadcast media, basics of time code, and format conversion.

 

DGM205 DIGITAL IMAGE DEVELOPMENT 3 CR

Students will be introduced to the concepts and applications of computer graphics in multimedia production. Students will create and prepare images for publication in print, video, animation, web and mobile delivery. Students will manipulate bitmap and vector images in two- and three-dimensional space. Students will improve images for professional delivery by retouching or creating realistic or imaginative images through compositing and other techniques to incorporate into various multimedia products. (Prerequisite: DGM100)

 

DGM206 DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION 3 CR

The course explores video production techniques that can be applied in a range of professional non-linear editing programs. Students develop video production skills that solve specific communication challenges and engage audiences while exploring the process of digital storytelling utilizing professional video editing techniques. Specific attention will be paid to utilizing storyboards for shot types, angles, cuts, and transitions. Exercises in production and post-production techniques will be applied for various media delivery. (Prerequisite: DGM100)

 

DGM220 WEB DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT 3 CR

Students will learn the fundamental principles and techniques of Web design and development. Topics include HTML, XML, CSS, JavaScript, HTTP, FTP, DOM, and tools for developing Web applications, graphics, and multimedia. (Prerequisites: DGM100 and DGM205)

 

DGM299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN DIGITAL MEDIA 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

ECONOMICS

 

ECN202 MACROECONOMICS 3 CR

Introduction to the behavior of our economy in the aggregate, focusing upon the process by which the economy achieves a certain level of output and employment. (SS)

 

ECN203 MICROECONOMICS 3 CR

The decision-making processes of individuals and business firms associated with the determination of what products will be produced, how they will be produced, and what prices specific goods and services will command. (SS)

 

ECN299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

ECN460 SUSTAINABLE ECONOMICS 3 CR

In this course students will learn the assumptions and values that underlie the free market economy and the link between the economic model and contemporary global issues such as environment, corporate social responsibility, poverty, war, democratic governance, and sustainable management. Students will research and evaluate real life constructive ideas and projects that have been developed to contribute to a more sustainable global economy. (Prerequisites: ECN202 and SDE100)

 

EDUCATION

 

EDU100 STUDENT SUCCESS STRATEGIES 3 CR

This course is designed to help students become engaged members of the College of Menominee Nation community and to introduce strategies and tools necessary for academic, professional, and personal success. This course is required for all Associate Degree programs excluding nursing and must be taken during the first semester. (CR)

 

EDU201 EMERGENT LITERACY 3 CR

This is an introduction to curriculum and methods for building a solid foundation of early literacy development at home and at school. Explicit strategies for teaching literacy to all young children, including children with diverse needs, within a balanced literacy approach will be emphasized. The emergent literacy spectrum will include theory, assessment, oral language and vocabulary development, phonological awareness, comprehension, writing, organizing and managing a literacy-based classroom, read-aloud, and motivation of reluctant readers and writers. Research and current best practices will be studied. An emphasis will be placed on relevant hands-on activities and projects. This course is primarily designed for teachers and future teachers. (Prerequisite: EDU238)

 

EDU211 INTRODUCTION TO EXCEPTIONALITIES 3 CR

This course will provide an introduction to special education services for the young child (birth through 11 years old). This course includes a study of atypical growth and development, an overview of State and Federal legislation, service coordination, and family-centered service. It combines underlying theory and practical strategies for development of effective communication and collaboration skills among families, professionals and community agencies. (Prerequisite: EDU236)

 

EDU236 INFANCY AND EARLY CHILDHOOD 3 CR

Current theories, methods of study and research in the study of human development from conception through the preschool years and the interrelationships among biological, socio-cultural and psychological aspects of development. (SS)

 

EDU237 OBSERVATION AND INTERPRETATION OF CHILD BEHAVIOR 3 CR

Study of the behavior and development of young children through direct, systematic observation of children in selected situations and comparison with established child development theories and data.

 

EDU238 PLAY AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES IN CHILDHOOD 3 CR

Concepts of the contributions of play and creative activities to physical, intellectual, emotional, and social aspects of development; specific contribution of selected creative activities.

 

EDU250 INTRODUCTION TO TEACHER EDUCATION 3 CR

This course provides an introduction to teaching as a profession. An overview of the conceptual framework, mission and goals, admission requirements, and competencies of the College of Menominee Nation’s teacher education program will be presented. NAEYC standards, Wisconsin teaching standards, learning theories and types of assessment will be reviewed. The practice of differentiation in classrooms will serve as a focus for the on-site classroom observations and practice. The teacher education component of the CMN portfolio will be introduced. Background check required.

 

EDU251 GEOMETRY FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS 3 CR

Geometry for Elementary Teachers is designed to prepare prospective K-8 teachers to be effective mathematics instructors. Emphasis is placed on a culturally relevant approach to geometry instruction at the elementary school level. Coursework will include the effective use of manipulatives, the application of geometry in the every-day settings of students, communication using the language of geometry, and a final project. Topics include symmetry, perimeter, area, similar shapes, proportions, angles, tessellations, measurement, transformations, scale, the use of formulas, and geometric shapes.

 

EDU256 SOCIAL AND FAMILY INFLUENCES ON EARLY DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING 3 CR

An ecological systems approach to social and family influences affecting success or failure in school. Child development and education risk theories, research, and practitioner accounts. Prevention and intervention programs for children (prenatal to age eight) and families at-risk.

 

EDU295 STUDENT PORTFOLIO SEMINAR 1 CR

This course guides graduating students through the process of developing an electronic portfolio. Following reflection on program outcomes and the College mission, students share highlights from their portfolios with the College community. Students must complete the Collegiate Assessment of Academic Progress exam and the Global Perspectives Inventory to receive a passing grade. (This course is required and must be taken during the student’s last semester prior to graduating with an Associate Degree.) (CR)

 

EDU299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN EDUCATION 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

EDU300 FOUNDATIONS OF AMERICAN EDUCATION 3 CR

In this course, teacher candidates explore the political, historical, philosophical, and sociological contexts of the American system of education and examine current teaching practice in light of them. The historical models of education on the Menominee, Stockbridge-Munsee or Oneida reservations will serve as a basis for reflection, analysis and comparison to national historic reform movements and current practice. The teacher candidates will examine the goals of schooling, the effects of culture on the educational process, and the place of education in society.

 

EDU301 EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY 3 CR

This course focuses on how teachers effectively integrate technology in the classroom to plan, implement, and assess the teaching-learning process. In this class, teacher candidates learn how to use technology to plan classroom activities, manage classroom assessment, promote positive classroom interactions, and participate in continuous professional development using technological tools beyond the textbook, kits, and other usual school/classroom resources. The Wisconsin’s Department of Public Instruction teacher and student standards will guide assessment activities as well as language and cultural elements established by CMN and tribes.

 

EDU302 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 CR

Teacher candidates will explore major theories of development and learning to apply these theories to the teaching and learning process and teacher reflection. The physical, social, emotional, moral and cognitive development of children from birth to adolescence will be used to as a basis for understanding students as diverse learners with various learning styles, intelligences and cultural expectations. Teacher candidates will also examine and apply motivation and classroom management techniques, approaches to exceptionalities and interpretation of student assessments to teaching strategies and evaluation of learning.

 

EDU304 METHODS FOR ART AND MUSIC 3 CR

This course explores the place and focus of music and the arts in an elementary curriculum. Teacher candidates will acquire a basic knowledge of the progressive ways children learn through music and artistic expression, as well as practice teaching strategies that employ motivation techniques to engage early childhood and elementary children in the arts. (Prerequisite: EDU250)

 

EDU305 METHODS FOR SOCIAL STUDIES 3 CR

This course is designed for teacher candidates to research, study and engage in social studies teachers’ best practices that effectively motivate elementary school children within a culturally diverse, interdependent world. Teacher candidates will use a constructivist approach to create, develop, plan, integrate, review, present and assess instructional materials in an elementary social studies classroom. (Prerequisite: EDU250)

 

EDU306 METHODS FOR TEACHING MATHEMATICS 3 CR

This course centers on how teachers create a positive classroom environment to facilitate children’s mathematical thinking through Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI). To this end, teacher candidates learn how to design and develop thematic activities where children solve problems by inventing/presenting their own mathematical problem-solving strategies; where children learn to take responsibility for their own learning, and where turn-taking is a valuable commodity given the powerful results of students learning from each other. (Prerequisite: EDU250)

 

EDU307 METHODS FOR TEACHING READING 3 CR

Methods for Teaching Reading is designed to assist teacher candidates in understanding reading as a developmental, cognitive and interactive process that leads to lifelong literacy. Within a literacy-rich environment, the teacher candidate will plan, develop, implement, and assess developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive reading lessons for early childhood/elementary students. (Prerequisite: EDU250)

 

EDU308 METHODS FOR LANGUAGE ARTS 3 CR

This course focuses on the interactive nature of the language arts—reading, speaking, listening, writing, viewing and visually representing. In a culturally responsive, developmentally appropriate manner, teacher candidates will learn to design instruction and assessment, create a literary environment in the classroom and strengthen teaching technological strategies to improve student literary skills. (Prerequisite: EDU250)

 

EDU309 METHODS FOR TEACHING SCIENCE 3 CR

Teacher candidates learn how to teach in a constructivist manner; guiding children in problem-solving activities, and at the same time working as co-inquirers, constructing their own conceptualizations about science content and planning/implementing/assessing science in the elementary school environment. (Prerequisite: EDU250)

 

EDU310 METHODS FOR TEACHING HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 CR

This course focuses on the relationship between health and physical education activities that foster healthy habits for school children. Teacher candidates learn how to design, develop, and assess lessons and activities that promote positive healthy lifestyles including good nutrition and lifelong physical activity. (Prerequisite: EDU250)

 

EDU311 PRE-STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR I 1 CR

This course coordinates supervised classroom experience required by the co-requisite methods courses (40+ hours) and reflection, discussion and evaluation in the practicum sessions. The course focuses on synthesizing course classroom management, planning, instruction, reflection and self-evaluation within and among diverse learners and children with exceptionalities. (Prerequisite: EDU250; Co-requisites: EDU307 and EDU308)

 

EDU312 PRE-STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR II 1 CR

This course (seminar) coordinates supervised classroom experiences in co-requisite methods courses (40+ hours) through discussion, reflection and evaluation of artifacts to be included in the pre-student teaching portfolio. Coordination centers on the artifacts that represent (planning, classroom instruction, problem solving, collaboration, and social justice) from co-requisite coursework. (Prerequisite: EDU250)

 

EDU313 INCLUSION STRATEGIES FOR EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS 2 CR

Study of pedagogical, curricular, and social considerations involved in educating learners with diverse learning needs in the general education classroom. Strategies for adapting curriculum to learners with special needs. (Prerequisites: HUD210 and EDU250)

 

EDU314 CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR AND MANAGEMENT 2 CR

Overview of the diverse behavioral needs encountered in the general education setting. Teaching strategies, classroom environment, and management techniques aimed at improving the knowledge and skills of all students. Techniques and strategies for maintaining appropriate behavior and changing inappropriate behavior. (Prerequisites: HUD210 and EDU250)

 

EDU315 CULTURAL IMAGES IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE 3 CR

Cultural Images in Children’s Literature is intended to increase the teacher candidate’s knowledge of theories and methods of choosing and evaluating multicultural children’s literature. Through this course, teacher candidates integrate multicultural children’s literature with language arts theories and practices in an early childhood/elementary education classroom.

 

EDU401 STUDENT TEACHING: PRE-KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 5. 12 CR

The student teaching experience provides an opportunity for the student teacher to explore the teaching profession and to practice the knowledge, skills and dispositions required for a classroom teacher. The components of this experience include observation, planning instruction, teaching, assessing, record keeping, supervision, participation in faculty activities, family and community interactions and student evaluation and follow-up in a full-day classroom setting. (Prerequisites: EDU211, EDU251, EDU300, EDU301, EDU302, EDU304, EDU305, EDU306, EDU307, EDU308, EDU309, EDU310, EDU311, EDU312, EDU313, EDU314, EDU315, and MAT260; Concurrent Requisite: EDU402)

 

EDU402 STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR 2 CR

The student teaching seminar is an opportunity for student teachers to process their teaching experiences in a peer group or community of learners. This course provides reflective student teachers the framework for inquiry into, problem solving and analysis of classroom situations, the teaching-learning process, professional issues, classroom management and professional development. The seminar will also provide assistance in preparing for professional employment. (Prerequisites: EDU211, EDU300, EDU301, EDU302, EDU304, EDU305, EDU306, EDU307, EDU308, EDU309, EDU310, EDU311, EDU312, EDU313, EDU314, EDU315, and MAT260; Concurrent Requisite: EDU401)

 

EDU499 SPECIAL TOPICS IN EDUCATION 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once. (Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing)

 

ELECTRICITY

 

ELT100 WORKPLACE SAFETY 1 CR

Examines electrical hazards and stresses the importance of electrical safety. The course covers the equipment and procedures necessary to work safely with electricity, including Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), lockout/tag out, first aid, and Occupational, Safety, and Health Administration 10 (OSHA10) Certification and CPR. Importance of and methods for grounding are explained. Coursework meets National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) certification requirements.

 

ELT101 BEGINNING ELECTRICAL CONCEPTS 5 CR

This course provides an overview of the electrical industry and electrical theory through Direct Current concepts. Students will develop an understanding of potential difference, current, resistance, Ohm’s Law, and Kirchhoff’s Law. Students will apply the power formula to series, parallel circuits, and series-parallel circuits. Students will acquire skills needed to complete the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) certification.

 

ELT102 RESIDENTIAL WIRING 3 CR

This course is designed to provide students with the technical skills and knowledge required to safely install, maintain, replace and repair residential wiring and distribution systems conforming to the National Electrical Code (NEC). Hands-on use of tools and equipment to complete and troubleshoot residential electrical wiring projects will be emphasized. Students will acquire skills needed to complete the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) certification.

 

ELT103 MATH FOR ELECTRICIANS I 3 CR

Review of fundamental math concepts with real-world, on the job scenarios. The course covers algebraic formulas and geometric concepts as used in the electrical trade.

 

ELT104 NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE I 2 CR

This course covers nationally recognized electrical standards, including electrical terms, calculations, safety issues and industry practice. General-use equipment, wiring methods and materials are defined and discussed. Wisconsin State Codes are reviewed and compared with national codes.

 

ELT105 MATH FOR ELECTRICIANS II 3 CR

Builds on concepts learned in Math for Electricians I. The course progresses to algebra and trigonometric functions. An analytical approach to problem solving is emphasized in geometry and trigonometry. Real world electrical situations are integrated into the coursework. (Prerequisite: ELT103)

 

ELT106 NATIONAL ELECTRIC CODE II 2 CR

A continuance of National Electrical Code I, this course covers nationally recognized electrical standards, including electrical terms, safety issues and industry practice. Emphasis is on codes for hazardous locations, special equipment, and special conditions. Wisconsin state codes are reviewed and compared with national codes. (Prerequisite: ELT104)

 

ELT107 ADVANCED ELECTRICAL CONCEPTS 5 CR

This course covers Alternating Current, including inductance, capacitors, resistive-capacitive series and parallel circuits, three-phase power, and three-phase circuits. Calculations and hands-on troubleshooting will be emphasized. Students will acquire skills needed to complete the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) certification. (Prerequisite: ELT101)

 

ELT108 COMMERCIAL WIRING 3 CR

This course prepares individuals to install, maintain, troubleshoot, and repair electrical devices, components, and equipment that are used in commercial electrical systems. This course focuses on overcurrent protection, proper grounding techniques, and associated safety procedures according to national and state codes. Students will acquire skills needed to complete the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) certification.

 

ELT109 INDUSTRIAL WIRING 3 CR

This basic course covers wiring methods used for industrial installations. It focuses on installation, troubleshooting, and testing of motors, transformers, and controls found in industry. Calculations and hands-on experience will be incorporated. Students will acquire skills needed to complete the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) certification.

 

ELT199 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ELECTRICITY 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

ENGINEERING

 

EGR101 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING 3 CR

Introduction to Engineering provides an introduction to the engineering design process, which is reinforced as the students complete a series of design projects to gain skills in engineering related to problem solving, logic and programming, team work, technical communication, professionalism, and ethics.

 

EGR201 STATICS 3 CR

This course introduces the principles, methods and language used in the investigation, diagnosis and synthesis of understanding of the properties of mechanical systems in static equilibrium. Topics include: Force and moment vectors, resultants and free-body diagrams; applications to simple trusses, frames and machines; distributed loads and internal forces in beams; properties of areas and second moments, and laws of friction in mechanical systems. Work includes student-led team projects and discussion section (Prerequisite: PHY203; Co-requisite: MAT232) (FL)

 

EGR299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

ENGLISH

 

ENG100 INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE ENGLISH FOUNDATIONS 3 CR

This course develops and sharpens a student’s knowledge of the basic principles of writing college-level essays. Students work on a series of essays to improve their ability to write clear, detailed prose and to use texts to support their claims. Students with ENG100 credit may not receive degree credit for ENG101. (Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score) (CR)

 

ENG101 INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE ENGLISH 3 CR

This course develops and sharpens a student’s knowledge of the basic principles of writing college-level essays. Students work on a series of essays to improve their ability to write clear, detailed prose and to use texts to support their claims. Students with ENG101 credit may not receive degree credit for ENG100. (Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score) (CR)

 

ENG102 COLLEGE ENGLISH AND RESEARCH 3 CR

This fundamental course in expository writing stresses style, logic, research, and methods of development. Analytical reading and writing and the methods of inquiry common to various academic disciplines will be explored. Students will write a documented research paper using suitable sources of information and appropriate methods of documentation. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101) (CR)

 

ENG206 INTRODUCTION TO POETRY 3 CR

This course is designed to introduce students to the world of poetry. Students will read, write, and discuss ideas, themes, meter, rhyme scheme, and implications of the works of prominent poets. Students will be provided with background information on the poets, source material to help them contextualize their readings, and other tools to help them understand the many facets of poetry. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101) (HUM)

 

ENG207 AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURE 3 CR

Students study literature from oral and written materials by and about Native American Indians. Significant works and writers past and present will be studied, read, and discussed. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101) (HUM)

 

ENG208 MINORITY WOMEN IN LITERATURE 3 CR

This course is an introduction to American literature by and about women, written by various authors from diverse ethnic groups. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101) (HUM)

 

ENG211 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING 3 CR

This course will be conducted as a fiction writing workshop with emphasis on class discussion of student work. The course will be structured around classic literary works, discussion of contemporary writers, and the study of literary techniques. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101) (FA or HUM)

 

ENG215 BUSINESS WRITING 3 CR

This course is a comprehensive writing course that provides the foundation for the student to develop the knowledge, skills, and understanding of business and professional documents such as letters, memos, email messages, and a variety of reports. Upon completion of this course, the student will demonstrate an understanding of the communication process, the writing process, written business correspondence, appropriate tone for communication, written business proposals, written solicitation, direct marketing, budgets, and grant writing. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101)

 

ENG299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGLISH 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

 

ENV150 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 3 CR

This course covers the interrelationships between people and the abiotic components of their environment. The scientific, social, and political implications of natural resources and their use are examined. (NS)

 

ENV299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

GEOGRAPHY

 

GEG110 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 5 CR

Physical geography is the study of the physical properties of the planet as the home for humankind. This is an introductory course with emphasis on the four individual spheres of the physical environment — the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and the terrestrial landscape — and the interrelationships among them. Includes labs. (NS)

 

GEG210 CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY 3 CR

Examines components and spatial expressions of contemporary culture, including patterns and problems of population, language, religion, urban and rural settlements and political and economic development from the perspectives of diffusion, ecology, integration, landscape, and region. (SS)

 

GEG245 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3 CR

This is an introduction to concepts and principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related spatial information technologies. It provides an overview of uses, components, and technical aspects of GIS and application use including automation, analysis, query, and display. It covers functionality and introduction to “Spatial Analyst” and the “Avenue” programming language. (Prerequisites: ENG100 or ENG101 and MAT104 or MAT106)

 

GEG299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOGRAPHY 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

HISTORY

 

HIS112 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES FROM 1865 TO THE PRESENT 3 CR

This course covers the forces that shaped the political, social, cultural, intellectual, and economic history of the United States since the Civil War. The experiences of various ethnic, religious and class groups and women will be examined. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101) (HUM or SS)

 

HIS121 SURVEY OF AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY 3 CR

This course surveys the social, cultural, economic, and political history of Indian nations in the United States with a focus on Wisconsin Indian groups. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101) (HUM or SS; TH)

 

HIS122 PRE-CONTACT HISTORY OF THE MENOMINEE NATION 3 CR

This course traces social and cultural history before European immigration by examining the influences of natural and cultural environments upon life-ways. It will use an ethno-historical approach which draws upon written sources and on living human documents expressed in oral histories. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101) (HUM or SS; TH)

 

HIS123 MENOMINEE TREATY ERA 3 CR

This course focuses on political and socio-cultural events from 1817 to 1856 when treaties were made by the Menominee Nation ending in the establishment of the current Menominee Reservation. Study of the treaties emphasizes the contexts in which they were signed and their relevance today. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101) (HUM or SS; TH)

 

HIS132 ONEIDA NATION OF WISCONSIN HISTORY 3 CR

This course introduces students to the Oneida Nation’s history as part of the Iroquois Confederacy in New York, and then discusses the causes and events that led to the settlement of the Oneida Nation in Wisconsin. The course will discuss how the tribe’s history and world view impacted the issues that the Wisconsin Oneidas have faced and will introduce students to Oneida cosmology, land and land claims, history, government, agriculture, economy and art. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101 or instructor consent) (HUM or SS; TH)

 

HIS133 TREATY ERA OF ONEIDA NATION OF WISCONSIN 3 CR

This course provides students with the opportunity to delve into the treaties that confirm Oneida Nation’s sovereignty. The course will examine the context of Oneida’s treaties including early interaction with colonists, treaties made with the U.S. government, New York State, the State of Wisconsin, and applicable federal policies. The course will also discuss the impact of Oneida’s treaties on land rights and contemporary issues. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101 or instructor consent) (HUM or SS; TH)

 

HIS299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101 or appropriate placement score)

 

HEALTH CARE

 

HLT090 HOME HEALTH AIDE 3 CR

This course covers the necessary skills determined by the State of Wisconsin for work in home health care. The instruction includes text, workbook and hands-on learning experiences. (Prerequisite: The Wisconsin State Legislature requires a background check under the Caregiver Law 48.685 and 50.065 Stats. Students with certain legal convictions may not be eligible to work in this field. Student must be at least 16 years old.)

 

HLT095 NURSING ASSISTANT 4 CR

This course will prepare the student for entry-level positions as a nursing assistant in a healthcare facility or a client’s home. The student will be able to perform specific nursing assistant care when under the direct supervision of a licensed nurse.

 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

 

HUD210 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 3 CR

Human development from conception through death; physical development, social and emotional development, personality development, the development of language, intellectual development and creativity, and the process of human learning. (SS)

 

HUD299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

HUMANITIES

 

HUM100 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES 3 CR

This course explores the role of the fine arts, language, literature, rhetoric, philosophy and history in constructing, maintaining, and interrogating the values and beliefs of human cultures. Topics vary. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101) (HUM)

 

HUM299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

LANGUAGE

 

LAN101 MENOMINEE LANGUAGE I 4 CR

For students with no previous training in Menominee language. Includes an introduction to the spoken language as well as to the written language. (HUM; TL)

 

LAN102 MENOMINEE LANGUAGE II 4 CR

Continuation of study in the Menominee language, its structure, and the relationship of the language to Menominee culture. (Prerequisite: LAN101 or instructor consent) (HUM; TL)

 

LAN103 MENOMINEE LANGUAGE III 4 CR

For students who have completed course I and II or have a high level of fluency in spoken Menominee language. Focuses on the use of conversational Menominee language in an immersion setting. (Prerequisite: LAN102 or instructor consent) (HUM; TL)

 

LAN111 ONEIDA LANGUAGE I 4 CR

An introductory course that provides students with basic lessons in the Oneida grammar, spelling system, and conversational vocabulary. (HUM; TL)

 

LAN299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN LANGUAGE 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

MATHEMATICS

 

MAT104 COLLEGE ALGEBRA FOUNDATIONS 3 CR

Properties of the real numbers, solving linear and quadratic equations, inequality, polynomial and fractional expressions and equations, algebra of exponents, powers and roots, systems of linear equations. Students with MAT104 credit may not receive degree credit for MAT106. (Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score) (CR)

 

MAT106 COLLEGE ALGEBRA 3 CR

Properties of the real numbers, solving linear and quadratic equations, inequality, polynomial and fractional expressions and equations, algebra of exponents, powers and roots, systems of linear equations. Additional lab work may be required. Students with MAT106 credit may not receive degree credit for MAT104. (Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score) (CR)

 

MAT115 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN SCIENCE 3 CR

Introduction to computer-aided data analysis and measurement. Topics include: elementary data acquisition and computer-based visualization, quality of numerical information, model fitting, numerical differentiation/integration, solution of differential equations and symbolic calculation and introduction to Computer Algebraic Systems software (MathCad and/or Maple). Includes discussion section. (Prerequisite: MAT104 or MAT106)

 

MAT120 ELEMENTARY FUNCTIONS: ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY 4 CR

Emphasizes aspects of algebra, trigonometry and problem solving that are important in the study of calculus. The course includes functions and their applications to real world problems and different classes of functions including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Graphing calculators are used frequently in class and on assignments. (Prerequisite: MAT104 or MAT106 or appropriate placement score)

 

MAT231 CALCULUS AND ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY I 4 CR

Differential and integral calculus of the elementary functions with associated analytic geometry; transcendental functions; techniques of integration; application; sequences and series. (Prerequisite: MAT120)

 

MAT232 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II 4 CR

Formal integration with an emphasis on algebra practicum and reinforcement of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, change of variables; infinite series with emphasis on power series and approximations, second order linear differential equations with constant coefficients and analytic geometry with vectors. The course will end with derivation of the fundamental laws of planetary motion. Graphing calculators are used frequently in class and on assignments. (Prerequisite: MAT231)

 

MAT234 MULTIVARIATE CALCULUS 3 CR

Multivariable Vector Calculus of space curves, surfaces and volumes. Includes double and triple integrals, the method of Lagrange multipliers, parametric curves in three dimensions, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, partial derivatives, continuity and differentiability in “R”, directional derivatives and the gradient. Also calculation of the center of mass, surface area, vector fields, line integrals and path independence. The class will close with surface integrals, Green’s Theorem, the Divergence Theorem and Stoke’s Theorem. Course includes discussion section. (Prerequisite: MAT232)

 

MAT247 LINEAR ALGEBRA AND DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 3 CR

Linear Algebra: matrix operations, Gaussian elimination, inverses, determinants, vector spaces and subspaces, linear dependence and independence, Wronskian, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonal matrices. Differential equations: first order linear, separable, second order linear with constant coefficients, method of undetermined coefficients, simple harmonic motion, linear systems with constant coefficients. Includes discussion section. (Prerequisite: MAT234 or instructor consent)

 

MAT260 INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS 4 CR

Descriptive and inferential statistics, frequency distributions, graphical techniques, measure of central tendency and of dispersion, probability distributions, large and small sample estimation and inference, regression correlation, analysis of count data, analysis of variance. (Prerequisite: MAT104 or MAT106 or appropriate placement score)

 

MAT299 SPECIAL TOPICS MATHEMATICS 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

NATURAL RESOURCES

 

NAR151 INTRODUCTION TO NATURAL RESOURCES 3 CR

Integrated management of natural resources and their role in social, ecological, spiritual, and economic welfare. Basic principles of ecology and the application of those principles to management of natural resources are covered. (NS)

 

NAR250 INTRODUCTION TO FORESTRY, FISHERIES, AND WILDLIFE 3 CR

Integrated introduction to principles and practices of forestry, fisheries, and wildlife management, including production of goods and services while maintaining ecosystem integrity and functions: emphasis on contemporary issues. (Prerequisite: NAR151; Concurrent Requisite: NAR251)

 

NAR251 INTRODUCTION TO FORESTRY, FISHERIES, AND WILDLIFE LABORATORY 1 CR

Laboratory component to NAR250 Introduction to Forestry, Fisheries, and Wildlife. The lab will provide hands-on opportunities. (Concurrent Requisite: NAR250)

 

NAR260 INTRODUCTION TO WATER AND SOIL RESOURCES 3 CR

Integrated concepts of soil and water resources at the landscape level. Physical, chemical, and biological interactions relating to watershed processes and responses to land use and management are identified. (Prerequisite: CHM101; Concurrent Requisite: NAR261)

 

NAR261 INTRODUCTION TO WATER AND SOIL RESOURCES LABORATORY 1 CR

Laboratory component to NAR260 Introduction to Water and Soil Resources. The lab will provide hands-on opportunities related to water and soil quality, their chemical and physical makeup, and interactions between the two. (Concurrent Requisite: NAR260)

 

NAR290 INTERNSHIP IN NATURAL RESOURCES 2 CR

Supervised training program in resource management in cooperation with private or public resource agencies. Additional requirements determined by Student Achievement Specialist before registration. May be repeated once. (Prerequisite: NAR151)

 

NAR299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN NATURAL RESOURCES 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

BUSINESS OFFICE TECHNICIAN

 

OFT100 Keyboarding 3 Cr

This course covers the professional keyboarding skills necessary for a Business Office Technician career. The beginning student will develop touch control of the keyboard and proper typing techniques, keyboarding speed and accuracy on numeric and alphabetic material. It will provide practice with the learned skills on the formatting of reports, letters, memos, tables and other kinds of personal and business communication. Students will also learn 10 key by touch.

 

OFT101 MICROSOFT WORD APPLICATIONS 2 CR

This course covers the necessary Microsoft Word skills for Certiport Microsoft Office Specialist Certification. The course includes application of intermediate to advanced word processing functions using Microsoft Word with tables and charts, merge features, AutoText, AutoFormat, styles, graphics, word art, watermarks and the creation of forms and templates. As the primary project in the course, students will have designed, developed and created an integrated project.

 

OFT102 MICROSOFT EXCEL APPLICATIONS 2 CR

This course covers the necessary Microsoft Excel skills for Certiport Microsoft Office Specialist Certification. As an overview of Microsoft Excel, this course covers basic features, such as creating, modifying, and printing a basic worksheet. The student will learn formulas and functions, formatting of cells, what-if analysis, and the utilization of the fill handle to create a series. As the primary project in the course, students will have designed, developed and created an Excel spreadsheet.

 

OFT103 BUSINESS PRESENTATIONS WITH MICROSOFT POWERPOINT 3 CR

This course covers the necessary Microsoft PowerPoint skills for Certiport Microsoft Office Specialist Certification. The course material includes application of intermediate to advanced slide presentation functions using Microsoft PowerPoint using advanced tools, masters, charts, illustrations, objects media clips and advanced features. Additionally, students will demonstrate interpersonal and public speaking skills for the modern office through individual and group presentations. As the primary project in the course, students will have designed, developed and created an artifact in Microsoft PowerPoint.

 

OFT104 PROFESSIONAL PROFILE 3 CR

The course materials cover the qualities and techniques needed to be an effective and successful employee in an increasingly sophisticated business world. The course will focus on business and social etiquette, teamwork, business grooming and wardrobe, decision making and problem solving, professional ethics, workplace politics and personalities, organization and employer expectations. This course covers the professional skills necessary for Certiport Certification.

 

OFT105 MATH WITH BUSINESS APPLICATIONS 3 CR

This course covers the necessary math skills to use formulas in Microsoft Excel for Certiport Microsoft Office Specialist Certification. The course material covers real numbers, basic operations, linear equations, percents, markups and markdowns, payroll calculations, simple interest, compound interest, annuities, the application of math to the buying and selling processes and basic statistics.

 

OFT106 PROOFREADING AND EDITING 3 CR

This course covers the necessary proofreading and editing skills for Certiport Certification. Students will improve proofreading skills through a review of proper punctuation, number usage, capitalization, grammar, editing symbols, word choice and spelling. Students will also learn machine transcription skills. Materials covered will help students to achieve the language skills needed to communicate effectively in the business environment and to achieve Certiport Certification.

 

OFT107 WRITTEN COMMUNICATION IN THE BUSINESS OFFICE 3 CR

This course covers the professional writing skills necessary for Certiport Microsoft Office Specialist Certification through a review of word choices, sentences and paragraphs, tone and awareness of audience and purpose. Materials covered will prepare students to write and properly format business correspondence, reports and job-seeking documents. As the end result of the course, students will have designed, developed and created a resume and cover letter as an artifact in Microsoft Word for their employment portfolio.

 

OFT108 RECORDS MANAGEMENT 3 CR

This course expands on the necessary database skills for Certiport Microsoft Office Specialist Certification. The course material provides learners with knowledge of the comprehensive field of records management. Emphasis will be placed on the principles and practices of effective records management for manual and automated database record systems.

OFT109 BUSINESS EXPERIENCE APPLIED 1 CR

This course is designed to provide students with the experience of working in an office setting. Students will document 45 hours at their internship location. Internship supervisors will sign time sheets to be submitted to the instructor on a bi-monthly basis. The instructor will meet with the placement supervisor a minimum of one time during the placement. Internship supervisors shall provide feedback on the student’s performance during the semester.

 

OFT199 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUSINESS OFFICE TECHNICIAN 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

PHILOSOPHY

 

PHL100 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 3 CR

Survey of important problems in philosophy, such as the nature of reality, knowledge, values, being, etc. (HUM)

 

PHL206 CONTEMPORARY MORAL PROBLEMS 3 CR

An attempt to clarify selected moral issues by applying insights of moral philosophy and tools of critical reflection. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101) (HUM)

 

PHL207 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS 3 CR

Philosophical, religious, and scientific concepts and values which have structured human attitudes toward the natural environment, and alternative concepts and values will be explored. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101) (HUM)

 

PHL217 AMERICAN INDIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHIES 3 CR

The study of traditional and contemporary American Indian thought about people in relationship to the natural world with particular reference to Wisconsin tribes. (HUM)

 

PHL299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

PHYSICS

 

PHY103 FUNDAMENTALS OF PHYSICS I 5 CR

A non-calculus physics course presenting a unified view of the fundamental principles of physics. Topics include vectors, kinematics, Newtonian dynamics, the conservation laws, and oscillatory motion. Includes lab. (Prerequisite: MAT104 or MAT106 or instructor consent) (PS)

 

PHY203 PHYSICS I 5 CR

First semester calculus-based physics for Engineering and Physical Science: measurement, energy and momentum, kinetics and dynamics of translation, rotation and oscillation, and introduction to thermodynamics. Includes laboratory. (Co-requisite: MAT231) (PS)

 

PHY204 PHYSICS II 5 CR

Second semester calculus-based physics for Engineering and Physical Science. Topics include: Electricity and Magnetism, AC and DC circuits, Electromagnetic Wave, Optics, Light and Matter. Includes laboratory and discussion sections. (Prerequisite: PHY203)

 

PHY231 PHYSICS III: PHYSICS OF MATTER 4 CR

Introduction to modern physics, thermodynamics, kinetic theory, wave-particle duality, wave nature of light, optics, matter waves, interference, stability, operators and expectation values, wave vectors and the Schrodinger equation, quantization and energy levels, elementary quantum mechanics, fundamentals of atomic and molecular structure, energy propagation in materials. Course includes special topics laboratory and discussion sections (Prerequisite: PHY204; Co-requisite: MAT234)

 

PHY299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICS 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

 

POL101 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 3 CR

Covers institutions and political processes of American national government and the nature of political analysis; the Constitution, ideological and cultural bases of American politics; the role of political parties, elections and interest groups, and policy-making processes in the Congress, the presidency and courts. (SS)

 

POL202 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY 3 CR

Contemporary issues in American public policy. Substantive public policies such as those dealing with the American economy, energy, crime, environmental quality, the welfare state and social programs. Models of the policy process are also considered. (SS)

 

POL208 TRIBAL GOVERNMENT 3 CR

Examination of tribal governments, tribal sovereignty, sources of tribal law (tribal constitutions, tribal codes, tribal common law, etc.) and contemporary tribal issues. (SS; TH)

 

POL299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to needs and interests. May be repeated one time.

 

PSYCHOLOGY

 

PSY100 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY 3 CR

Students gain an overview of the field of psychology across cognitive, social, and clinical perspectives. This course provides information to students to examine basic assumptions of established theories in the home, school, and work settings. (SS)

 

PSY201 ISSUES IN DIVERSITY AND DISCRIMINATION 3 CR

This course introduces students to public policies, regulations, and programs that either exacerbate or remediate issues in diversity and discrimination. The course addresses both historical and current issues, how discrimination is addressed individually and collectively, and how an upbringing involving diversity and discrimination impacts the daily lives of American Indians and other individuals who encounter such issues. (Prerequisite: HUD210 or PSY100) (SS)

 

PSY299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

SUSTAINABLE RESIDENTIAL BUILDING SYSTEMS

 

RES 110 APPLIED MATHEMATICS I 2 CR

This course reviews mathematic skills used in a variety of trades. These include fractions and decimals, and trades-specific applications of percents, area, volume, ratios, measurement, algebra and formulas for geometric shapes. Also covered are skills necessary to solve equations associated with material estimating, triangle theory, slopes, volume, estimates of weight using board feet, and gas pressure settings.

 

SOCIOLOGY

 

SOC100 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 3 CR

Sociology as a special field of social science, social relations, and social systems; the organization of societies/other human groupings; fundamentals of sociological investigation, dealing with the underlying premises, concepts, logic, and methods of sociology. (SS)

 

SOC208 SOCIOLOGY OF FAMILY 3 CR

Marriage and families in society; historical changes in family life; problems of defining family, social class, ethnicity/gender as key variables in family power, life transitions, and divorce/remarriage. (Prerequisite: HUD210 or SOC100) (SS)

 

SOC299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

 

SDE100 INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3 CR

Students examine ways to develop effective solutions across the spectrum of sustainable development concerns (environmental, economic, and social), leading to lasting solutions responsive to the interests of all affected parties. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101) (CR and SS)

 

SDE299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

THEATER

 

THE101 AMERICAN INDIAN THEATER 3 CR

This course is designed to introduce students to the history of contemporary American Indian Theater. Students will read, critique, and discuss the ideas, themes, settings, and possible productions of the works of prominent American Indian playwrights. (FA or HUM)

 

THE201 THEATER PRODUCTION 3 CR

This course is designed to give students hands-on experience with creating a theater production. Through students’ desires and auditions, the instructor will place the students into cast and crew roles for the production. Then, using Stanislavski method acting, students will develop in their roles to create wholly-realized characters who define and shape the production. Meanwhile, the crew of the show will create the technical elements to enhance the show. Together, the cast, crew, and director will work to create a unified theatrical production for the College of Menominee Nation and the surrounding community. (FA or HUM)

 

THE202 PLAYWRITING 3 CR

This is an introductory course designed to give students hands-on experience in the craft of playwriting. Students will learn through specific techniques, practical exercises, exploration of exemplary plays, and the employed methodology of award-winning playwrights. At the completion of this course, students will have composed fully-realized fifteen-minute plays that are ready for both staged readings and full theatrical productions. (Prerequisite: ENG100 or ENG101) (FA or HUM)

 

THE299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN THEATER 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

WELDING

 

WEL101 SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING (SMAW) 5 CR

This course offers skill development in the SMAW, GMAW, OAW and OAC processes. Titanium and low-hydrogen electrodes are used for all-position “stick” welding. Students gain thorough knowledge of process fundamentals and applications, and apply welding knowledge and skill to simple fabrications and repairs.

 

WEL102 GAS METAL ARC WELDING/METAL INERT GAS (GMAW/MIG) 5 CR

This course offers skill development in the SMAW, GMAW, and MIG processes. Low-hydrogen and cellulose electrodes are used for all-position “stick” welding. Students also gain thorough knowledge of process fundamentals and applications. Students apply welding knowledge and skill to simple fabrications and repairs.

 

WEL103 FLUX CORE ARC WELDING (FCAW) 5 CR

This course allows for advanced skill development in FCAW welding processes. Students also gain skill and knowledge in GMAW and SMAW. Students apply welding knowledge and skill to various certification tests and fabrications projects.

 

WEL104 GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING/TUNGSTEN INERT GAS (GTAW/TIG) 5 CR

In this course, students gain basic skill and knowledge in GTAW, TIG, and SAW, as well as PAC and ACAC. Students apply welding knowledge and skill to various certification tests and fabrication projects.

 

WEL105 2D MACHINE TOOL CAD 1 CR

In this course, students will study the operation and uses of interactive computer graphics systems. Students will also develop basic skills in creating, modifying, editing, storing and plotting 2-dimensional AutoCAD drawings, while using basic knowledge of available hardware and software on assignment projects.

 

WEL106 WELDING MATERIALS AND METALLURGY 2 CR

Welding Materials and Metallurgy is an exploration of physical and mechanical metallurgy within the context of welding fabrication. Students practice identification of ferrous and non-ferrous metals and study material properties as related to crystal and microstructures. The effects of various welding and heat treatment processes on metal properties are studied. Weld defects are investigated through destructive and nondestructive testing.

 

WEL111 WELDING BLUEPRINT READING AND SKETCHING 2 CR

This course affords students the opportunity to make and interpret prints. Students will study print format, line types, orthographic views, dimensioning, welding symbols and bill of materials. Students apply these concepts by creating and fabricating from prints in group activities. Students will practice basic layout skills and safe operation of saws, shears, drills and presses.

 

WEL199 SPECIAL TOPICS IN WELDING 1-3 CR

Topics vary according to interest and needs. May be repeated once.

 

COURSE OPTIONS

 

ALTERNATIVE COURSE DELIVERY

CMN may cancel classes for a variety of reasons; therefore, some courses may be offered by alternative course delivery methods or other means. Eligibility for alternative course delivery requires that a student possess a minimum GPA of 2.00 and have Sophomore status. Students must contact their assigned Student Achievement Specialist for assistance. These courses are denoted with a section number starting with 9 (i.e. 91, 92 or 99).

 

SPECIAL TOPICS

Occasionally special topics courses (i.e., XXX199, XXX299, or XXX499) are offered to address emerging trends or specialized content not available through the general curriculum. Degree-seeking students are allowed to take two Special Topics courses. These opportunities are only announced through course schedules and may have financial aid restrictions. Your Student Achievement Specialist or faculty member can provide specific information when these courses are scheduled. (Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing for XXX499 courses)

 

INDEPENDENT STUDY

The purpose of Independent Study is to allow the student to explore a topic of scholarly interest which is not available through traditional CMN coursework.

 

XXX293 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-6 CR

Independent Study is offered on an individual basis to students who want to study an area not represented in available scheduled courses. It consists of a program of scholarly and/or research activities carried out over a semester that are planned with and supervised by a full-time faculty member with expertise in the area. A Request for Independent Study form, signed by the student and full-time faculty member, must be submitted to the Dean of Instruction for approval in advance of registration. This course cannot be used to fulfill a General Education or Program Emphasis requirement. (Prerequisite: Cumulative GPA 3.00 or higher)

 

XXX493 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-6 CR

Independent Study is offered on an individual basis to students who want to study an area not represented in available scheduled courses. It consists of a program of scholarly and/or research activities carried out over one semester that are planned with and supervised by a full-time faculty member with expertise in the area. A Request for Independent Study form, signed by the student and full-time faculty member, must be submitted to the Dean of Instruction for approval in advance of registration. This course cannot be used to fulfill a General Education or Program Emphasis requirement. (Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing; Cumulative GPA 3.00 or higher)